• Anima is an immersive installation that explores the concept of the soul and the divide between Man and Animal through an unprecedented collaboration between artists, magicians and anthropologists.

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  • Interested in the process of sculpture making, Prune has been creating works that capture specific moments of the production process, inviting viewers to witness behind-the-scene ephemeral stages in which she finds beauty.

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  • In Prune's Imbalance series, the artist re-appopriates tools traditionally used to balance the body flow such as acupuncture needles and suction cups. Instead of conveying healing, these tools are used to suggest illness or threat in the resulting sculptures.

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  • Set as part of Prune Nourry's Terracotta Daughters, the concept of the dinner is based on an archeology-inspired scenography, inviting guests to make use of archeology research tools to dig through layers of food, inearthing parts of sculptures.

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  • In an extension of her Holy Daughters project in India, Prune now reflects upon gender preference in China and immerses herself in the local culture through the familiar symbol of the Terracotta Soldiers, by creating an army of 108 life-size Terracotta Daughters. In 2015, the Terracotta Daughters' Army was buried in Mainland China, following a performance entitled the Earth ceremony, with participants becoming the eyewitnesses of the birth of this “contemporary archeological site” - excavation planned in 2030.

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  • Holy River is the culmination of the Holy Daughters three-year project on gender selection focused on India. Nourry immersed herself in the local culture by commissioning local craftsmen to recreate a monumental version of her invented goddess, inviting the viewer to question accepted values.

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  • In her second performance in India, Nourry re-appropriated the Holi festival and invited little girls to play with milk powder around her Holy Daughter goddess.

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  • The Holy Daughters project began in 2010 as a performance in the streets of New Delhi. Nourry abandoned resin versions of her hybrid sculptures and recorded the local’s reactions - inviting to question gender preference.

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  • Prune explores the complicated themes of gender and sexual identity. Travelling through time, from the myth of creation, to a permissive Classical antiquity, the Baroque libertines, and today’s exploding porn industry, Prune collaborates with performers, animating sculpture and examining the relationship between religion and sexuality.

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  • For the ongoing series In Vitro, begun in 2010, Nourry uses found laboratory glassware to create unique sculptural pieces inspired by genetics.

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  • The Spermbar project questions the sperm-bank industry and its practices.

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  • In 2009, the artist began her Procreative Dinners (ephemeral works crossing art, science and gastronomy), bringing together a star chef and a scientist to reflect upon the idea of children “à la carte”.

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  • Through the Bébés Domestiques project, Prune Nourry questions the boundaries between humans and animals, genetic manipulation, and the anthropomorphization of pets.

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